All Hallows Church, Barking, Essex, England

Wall monument in Barking, Essex dedicated to Captain John Lytcott RN d. 1697

Memorial: M1243
A large wall monument consisting of an inscribed column, without a capital, but standing on a moulded and inscribed pedestal, with an architectural background and two children who act as supporters to the upper part of the column and hold inverted torches, one of which is missing. The lower part is elaborately designed with carved consoles and a substructure of a cove three times recessed, over foliage surrounding a mask.

Exchange Flags, Liverpool, England

Memorial: M689
(Liverpool Mercury 22 Oct 1813)' On a casement of Westmorland Marble stands a circular pedestal of the same material, and particularly suitable in colour to the group which it supports. At the base of the pedestal, are four emblematical figures of heroic size, in the character of captives or vanquished enemies; an allusion to the four signal victories obtained by Lord Nelson, viz those of St. Vincent, the Nile, Copenhagen and of Trafalgar. The space between these figures, on the sides of the pedestal, are filled by four grand bas-reliefs, executed in bronze representing some of the great naval actions in which the immortal Nelson was engaged. The rest of the pedestal is richly decorated with lions heads and festoons of laurel; and in a moulding round the upper part of it, is inscribed in letters of brass, pursuant to the resolution of the general and meeting, that most impressive charge, delivered by this illustrious commander, previous to the commencement of the battle of Trafalgar: ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO DO HIS DUTY. The figures constituting the principal design are Nelson, Victory and Death; his country mourning for his loss, and her navy eager to avenge it, naturally claim a place in the group. The principal figure is the Admiral, resting one foot on a conquered enemy and the other on a cannon. With an eye steadfast and upraised to Victory he is receiving from her a fourth naval crown upon his sword; which to indicate the loss of his right arm, is held in his left hand. The maimed limb is concealed by the enemy's flag, which Victory is lowering to him, and under the folds of which Death lies in ambush for his victim; intimating that he received the reward of is valour and the stroke of Death at the same moment. By the figure of an exasperated British Seaman, is represented the zeal of the navy to wreak vengeance on the enemies who robbed it of its most gallant leader. Britannia with laurels in her hand, and leaning regardless of them on her spear and shield, represents the feelings of the country fluctuating between the pride and anguish of a triumph so dearly purchased, but relying for security upon her own resources.'

St James's Church, Weybridge, Surrey, England

Wall tablet in St James’s Church, Weybridge, Surrey, dedicated to Vice-Admiral Thomas Hopson d. 1717

Memorial: M4817
Arms in centre of a broken pediment above the inscription tablet which is flanked by pilasters, a winged cherub's head below.

All Saints Church, Selworthy, Somerset, England

Memorial at Selworthy to Charles Baldwyn Dyke Acland who died of fever during anti-slave trade operations in 1837.

Memorial: M3858
Draped sarcophagus with two relief portraits. On plinth of sarcophagus a hymn book and sextant.

Admiralty Arch end of Mall, London, England

Statue in the Mall, London dedicated to Captain James Cook RN d. 1799

Memorial: M883
A full-length figure standing in front of a capstan with foot on a coil of rope. The stone plinth carved with ship's bows and a globe within a wreath.

Cathedral, Bristol, England

Window dedicated to Sir Walter Ralegh d. 1618, in Bristol Cathedral.

Memorial: M5891
Full length standing figure in four light window as companion to Robert Blake.